Selections from CT’s best J. I. Packer articles. Theologian J. I. Packer was one of the most widely respected Christian writers of the twentieth century. Author of over forty books, he was known for profound theological writing that was always lively and worshipful. Explore several articles included the anthology Pointing to the Pasturelands, a compilation of J. I. Packer’s columns and articles that covers several decades of Packer’s contributions in the pages of Christianity Today. Continue reading…

Our divisions are markedly political, and they echo religious controversies of the past. “You have heard that it was said to the people long ago, ‘You shall not murder, and anyone who murders will be subject to judgment,’” Jesus told the crowd in the Sermon on the Mount. “But I tell you that anyone who is angry with a brother or sister will be subject to judgment. … You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery,’” he continued. “But I tell you that anyone who looks at a woman lustfully has already committed adultery with her…

How political divides impact religious affiliation and attendance. The 2016 presidential election heightened an ongoing discussion over the allegiance of American evangelicals to the Republican Party. As countless articles and social media posts have observed, Donald Trump’s presidency has led many church leaders to warn against a too-warm embrace of politics and politicians, as well as led many Christians to rethink their involvement and identity as evangelicals. Though these tense conversations may feel like new ground born out of this political moment, long before Trump’s election there was already strong evidence showing that Americans’ political identities and disagreements fuel their…

A simple definition based in doctrine, history, or sociology won’t do. But a vibrant stream really does exist. Evangelicalism is one of the largest and most dynamic forms of Christianity in the modern world, but there is an amorphous quality to many words that end with the suffix “-ism,” and “evangelicalism” is no exception. “Evangelicalism” does not have the hard and crisp denotation of a concrete noun such as “Jesuit.” This confusion goes back to lexical roots. The English language uses the Anglo-Saxon noun “gospel” for the Greek “evangel” but retains the Greek root for the adjective “evangelical” and the…