Conversations about equality often lack goodwill. Part of the problem is a newfound fear of common grace. This piece is the second installment in a two-part series on racial justice debates. Read the first article here. The words critical race theory, systemic racism, woke, and social justice are case studies in language confusion. People define these terms in radically different ways and use those definitions to distort the views of others. To some, systemic racism means that discrimination exists in different social, political, and legal structures to varying degrees and intensities. Others think of systemic racism as the idea that…

In a previous blog I showed how to use the reverse interlinear to identify the μέν – δέ construction in the New Testament. Please review that blog to fully understand the significance of this discourse feature that Faithlife scholar-in-residence Dr. Steve Runge refers to as Point-Counterpoint. style=”border: 2px solid #eaeaea;” In today’s blog I’ll show how to execute a simple search in an English Bible to locate most occurrences of this construction. Open an English Bible with the interlinear option such as the ESV, NKJV, or NASB Navigate to Luke 10:2 (A) Click the Inline interlinear icon on the Bible’s…

I was recently studying 1 Peter 3:18 which in the ESV ends with: being put to death in the flesh but made alive in the spirit Using the inline interlinear feature I observed at the beginning of the first clause was a Greek word (μέν or men) that wasn’t translated. Then at the beginning of the second clause was a Greek conjunction (δέ or de) which was translated but. I immediately recognized the μέν – δέ construction that Faithlife’s scholar-in-residence Dr. Steve Runge taught me years ago. In The Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament Glossary he refers to this as…