Why Christians should support the “compelling interest” standard of accommodation. For Christians, the rule should be something like this: Protect other people’s religious liberty as you would like your religious liberty to be protected. Many believers will celebrate today because the Supreme Court ruled in Fulton v. Philadelphia that Catholic Social Services in Philadelphia should be able to continue operating according to its religious principles without getting its contract canceled by the city. That will be hailed as a victory, and it should. But the freedom of those at a Catholic foster care agency to do their work as committed…

The Biden administration support of religious school exemptions is making news, but the Equality Act is still a major concern. In a court filing Tuesday, June 8th, the Department of Justice (DOJ) said it intends to “vigorously” defend the religious exemption for religious schools allowing them to practice according to their belief. This was a surprise to many, but it may be an encouraging one. The court filing came as a response to religious schools and organizations feeling that their “interests will not be adequately protected” by the present administration. The DOJ hopes to assuage some of those concerns by…

Thailand’s monarchy, a bedrock of modern Thai identity, is under scrutiny. But protests have provoked counterdemonstrations from royalists.

The history and heritage of Christianity. Creeds and their critical role in the formation of the Church leading up to today. Bible versions and their dependability. Answering those who say Christianity is for fools and has no answers for the intellectual mind. These are vitally important areas of Christian thought and knowledge, and exploring them helps you become more confident in your faith. The newest releases from Lexham Press answer questions about these topics to equip you to know your faith, better engage your world, and confidently defend what you know is true. And for a short time when you…

Appeal: Exemptions do more than just save pastors $800 million a year. When a pastor responds to late-night prayer request or invites congregants to his home for Bible study, is he just doing his job or going beyond the call of duty? That’s not a question for the federal government to decide, according to the Chicago-area pastors and churches appealing a 2017 ruling that declared tax breaks for clergy housing costs to be unconstitutional. The lawsuit over the longstanding benefit, launched by the Freedom from Religion Foundation (FFRF) seven years ago, has entered another round of appeals. The Christian defendants,…