A mainstay on the bestseller lists, the often wry and deadpan Sedaris takes a victory lap with this amusing collection of published work.

David Allen Sibley’s lavishly illustrated “What It’s Like to Be a Bird” is more for perusing indoors – it’s too big to fit in your pocket.

How does the book of Psalms help make sense of life, art, metaphor, violence, suffering, and mortality? How do the Psalms reflect God’s attributes of justice, grace, goodness, healing, power, and refuge? How are the millennia-old psalms a guide to living faithfully the modern Christian life in the midst of joys, sorrows, angers, doubts, praises, and thanksgivings? Bible Gateway interviewed W. David O. Taylor (@wdavidotaylor) about his book, Open and Unafraid: The Psalms as a Guide to Life (Thomas Nelson, 2020). [Sign up to receive the FREE 5-day email devotional The Psalms as a Guide to Life] What is the…

Weird biblical names are on the rise. What’s behind the trend? You probably know someone who’s given their child, and especially their baby boy, an obscure biblical name. Sunday schools are increasingly filled with boys named Asher, Silas, Hezekiah, or Ezra. Meanwhile boy names like John, Michael, David, and James appear to be falling out of favor. The numbers back up this perception. According to current data from the Social Security Administration, “unusual” biblical names are getting more common for baby boys, with historically “rare” Bible names rising from about 0.5% of boys in the 1950s to a whopping 6.5%…

Weird Bible names are on the rise. What’s behind the trend? You probably know someone who’s given their child, and especially their baby boy, an obscure biblical name. Sunday schools are increasingly filled with baby boys named Asher, Silas, Hezekiah, or Ezra. Meanwhile boy names like John, Michael, David, and James appear to be falling out of favor. The numbers back up this perception. According to current data from the Social Security Administration, “unusual” biblical names are getting more common for baby boys, with historically “rare” Bible names rising from about 0.5% of boys in the 1950s to a whopping…

The Evangelical Missiological Society founder changed how we think of contextualizing the gospel. David Hesselgrave, the driving force behind the evangelical study of missions in the 20th century, died this week at age 94. Hesselgrave built the missions program at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (TEDS) and cofounded the Evangelical Missiological Society, teaching generations of scholars and missions workers around the world more effective ways to share the gospel across cultures (as referenced in the titles of his popular textbooks: Planting Churches Cross-Culturally; Communicating Christ Cross-Culturally; Counseling Cross-Culturally). “Not just the volume but the significance of the content of his writings…

David Hesselgrave is considered the founding dean of modern evangelical missiology. Nearly a decade ago I had the privilege of co-editing a book alongside Dr. David Hesselgrave called MissionShift: Global Mission Issues in the Third Millennium. It was an honor to co-labor on a project with a man who had been so influential not only to me, but to so many in the field of missiology. David set the stage for many rising missiologists to understand cultures and to contextualize each in a way that honors God and others. Although David has passed away, his legacy will, without a doubt,…

The learning curve in this conversation about race is steep and more complex than the Black-White binary. And because of that, it can become emotionally exhausting for all of us. Expository Faithfulness and Racism Attention prominent White pastor: If you want to avoid controversy, do not preach sermons on race at large evangelical conferences. In 2018, that will not go well for you. This week, David Platt discovered this at Together for the Gospel (T4G) in Louisville, Kentucky. Tasked with the responsibility of preaching on race and the church in America, Platt walked attendees through Amos 5:18-27, which includes the…