How believers can stay up on the day’s events without becoming prisoners of the moment. At Bethel University in Minnesota, where I’m a professor of English and journalism, I often teach a course for college seniors called “What Good is Leisure?” (Many students who sign up mistakenly believe they’re in for a restful three-credit experience.) It’s a course about “the architecture of time,” to use Abraham Heschel’s phrase, and my students this year were more responsive than ever to the flabbiness of their calendar. COVID-19 had destroyed the rhythm of their weeks. It had beckoned them to spend hours doom-scrolling…

My grown-up grandchildren’s new toys consist of electronics. So I decided to pass along the little red-and-yellow toy car to someone else’s driveway.

Canada’s indigenous groups are using new means to stop ‘child apprehensions,’ in which the government takes children from their mothers.