Messianic Jews and Palestinian Christians tell CT how they and their churches minister across the divide as Hamas and the IDF war once again. Bombs fall in Gaza as rockets target Israel. Frustrated Arab rioters are met by extremist Jewish settlers. And in the middle of it all, Danny Kopp sent his boys out to play soccer. Numbers were down at the Jerusalem neighborhood park frequented by Jew and Arab alike, but his 13-, 10-, and 8-year-old sons still translated between the sides. “These encounters, as small as they are, remind belligerents that coexistence is still viable,” said the chairman…

Letters to the editor for the March 16, 2020 weekly magazine. Readers discuss the best way to restore trust and preserve national sovereignty.

Libya’s oil and resources tempt outsiders. But at stake for the Arab world in Libya’s war is also the struggle between democracy and autocracy.

Literary device theory is gaining popularity among scholars. Philosopher Lydia McGrew doesn’t buy it. Recently, a number of New Testament scholars have been very interested in exploring the possibility that the gospel writers might have been using literary devices in their work. Why do some of their accounts differ gospel to gospel? Did they embellish the facts? Did they create stories to make a point? Michael Licona (interviewed by CT on this topic) and other leading scholars are of the mind that some of these literary devices help explain why the gospel writers don’t tell the same exact narrative. Christian…

Conflict between the U.S. and Iran may never reach a stage similar to a traditional war. But risks of both physical and cyber attacks are very real.

Moral pressure to protect civilians is rising in many forums, helping to set a limit on wider war.

When clashing political views threatened a longtime friendship, today’s contributor found that learning more about God as Love enabled her to nurture compassion and patience rather than anger and intolerance, and harmony was restored.

We have an obligation as leaders to have a plan in place to resolve conflicts in the healthiest way possible. Conflict is inevitable. Even in a healthy marriage, family and church. Like healthy marriages and families, healthy churches don’t avoid conflict, but they deal with it well. I’ve been in pastoral ministry for more than 35 years. In the early days, I dealt with more conflict than in recent years. Not because the early churches were bad, but because I didn’t know how to deal with conflict as well as I do today. Unfortunately, I learned how to deal with…

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