After leaving her counterinsurgency career, Euphrates Institute founder Janessa Gans Wilder has worked to support peace builders worldwide.

How insights from genealogy can help change the terms of a contentious debate. Ever since Charles Darwin proposed his theory of evolution, Christians have struggled to locate Adam and Eve within an evolutionary past. According to the traditional reading of the first chapters of Genesis, God created Adam and Eve directly and all human beings descended from that first couple. Yet many Christians have discarded this belief on the basis of evolutionary science, which holds that human beings, having descended from animals, first appeared on earth as a population rather than a single, divinely created pair. S. Joshua Swamidass, a…

I used to feel a lot of pressure to read must-read books. I felt guilty when I saw books on my friends’ shelves that I clearly should have read by that time. Things like Calvin’s Institutes, and whatever else my more advanced peers in biblical studies had read. I still feel some of that pressure, and I think some of it is healthy. But then one of my favorite writers, Alan Jacobs, liberated me. He recommended that I drop out of the Vigilant School of the Must-Reads and live my reading life under the sign of Whim. I should read…

Do you ever feel like God has not lived up to your expectation in some particular circumstance of your life? Perhaps you have believed… yet nothing has happened. When you feel confused and wondering if God has let you down, you have a choice to make. You can choose to be offended at God’s seeming silence and disinterest and allow doubt to slip into your heart… or… you can choose to believe God loves you with a lavish love and has your best interest at heart… even when things seem to make no sense to you. Jesus addressed this very…

How Civil War–era churches that avoided taking sides on slavery ended up siding with its supporters. In antebellum and Civil War–era America, churches and denominations along the border between North and South voiced what would have been considered “moderate” opinions on slavery. But as April Holm shows in A Kingdom Divided, neutrality was attractive but never really neutral. It was a political choice like any other. Border-region evangelicals were not proslavery ideologues; neither were they abolitionists. Mostly, they believed churches should focus on “spiritual” matters and avoid weighing in on controversial political debates. Slavery, however, was an all-encompassing system—the central…